Does Polyester Dye With Dylon? (Why, How, and Tips)

Dylon is a brand of fabric dye that is popular among crafters and DIY enthusiasts. It comes in various colors and can be used to dye many types of fabric.

Polyester is one of the most common fabrics for making crafts. But does polyester dye with Dylon? The answer is yes, as long as the fabric is no more than 50% polyester.

Does Polyester Dye With Dylon? (Why, How, and Tips)

This article will explore that question and give tips on getting the best results when using Dylon dye on polyester fabric.

About Dylon Dye

Does Polyester Dye With Dylon? (Why, How, and Tips)

Dylon dye is a fabric dye made from synthetic dyes that bond with the fabric’s fibers. It can refresh old items’ color or change them entirely.

Dylon offers various colors in powder form and also produces pre-mixed liquid dyes in some colors. One package of Dylon dye is enough to dye up to 1 pound of fabric.

You can dye larger items in a washing machine (washing machine dye), while smaller items can be dyed by hand (hand dye).

Dylon also offers special dyes for natural fabrics like cotton and a unique dye for silk and nylon.

Does Polyester Dye with Dylon?

soaking in dye
Credit: canva

Polyester and Dylon Dye

Dylon dye is not effective on 100% polyester items, but it can be used to color natural fiber and polyester blends. The company recommends against using the product on any fabric containing more than 50 percent synthetic fibers.

Fabrics like cotton, linen, and viscose will absorb the full shade of dye shown on the packet.

But if you’re trying to dye a fabric made from multiple materials, like polyester, you’ll likely only achieve a lighter version of that shade.

Why is Polyester Difficult to Dye?

polyester
Polyester fabric. Credit: canva

Polyester is a synthetic fabric made from petroleum-based chemicals. It is often used in clothing and home decor because it is durable and wrinkle-resistant.

It is also not very porous; synthetic fibers don’t absorb the dye or natural fabrics like cotton or wool.

When dyeing fabrics, you need to consider the ratio of polyester to natural fibers. The natural fibers in the blend will make dyeing easier because they absorb the dye more readily.

How to Dye with Dylon

dyeing process
Credit: canva
  1. You’ll first need to dissolve the dye in hot water according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
  2. Once the dye is dissolved, add your garment to the dye bath and stir gently until it is evenly saturated with color.
  3. Allow the garment to soak for 30 minutes before removing it from the dye bath and rinsing it in cool water.
  4. Finally, wash your garment according to the care instructions on the label and enjoy your new piece of clothing! 

Tips

To get the best results, follow these tips:

  • Use hot water and a hotter wash cycle (if using a washing machine)
  • Use a higher concentration of dye
  • Let the fabric soak for a longer time in the dye bath
  • Check for even coverage during the dyeing process.
  • Consider doing multiple dye baths to achieve a deeper color
  • Doing a test swatch before dyeing the entire item is a good idea.
  • Remember that you may not achieve the full shade shown on the packaging, and choose your color accordingly.

FAQs

What material can be dyed with Dylon?

Almost any natural or synthetic fabric can be dyed with Dylon. This includes cotton, silk, wool, polyester, nylon, and acrylic.

However, some fabrics may not be suitable for all colors or shades of dye. Always read the manufacturer’s instructions before beginning any dyeing project.

Which dye is best for polyester?

A synthetic disperse dye is the best solution for dyeing polyester fabric.  It is a type of dye specifically designed to adhere to synthetic fibers. Disperse dyes are commonly used in the textile industry for polyester and other synthetic fabrics.

Can you use fabric dye of 100% polyester?

Yes, you can use fabric dye of 100% polyester. However, the results may not be what you’re expecting.

Polyester tends to be more resistant to fading than natural fibers, so the dyed fabric may not stay looking new for very long.